Friday, December 6, 2013

Caramel Sauce


About Caramel Sauce:

Caramel (/ˈkærəmɛl/ or /ˈkɑrməl/) is a beige to dark-brown confectionery product made by heating any of a variety of sugars. It is used:
The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 170 °C (340 °F). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and re-form into compounds with a characteristic color and flavor.
A variety of candiesdesserts, and confections are made with caramel: brittlesnougatspralinescrème brûléecrème caramel, and caramel apples. Ice creams sometimes are flavored with or contain swirls of caramel.

Caramel Sauce:

Caramel sauce is made by heating water and caster sugar (also called superfine sugar) at a low to moderate temperature until the sugar dissolves and "caramelizes," changing color to golden brown.

Caramel candy:

Caramel candy is a soft, dense, chewy candy made by boiling a mixture of milk or cream, sugar(s), butter, and vanilla flavoring. The sugar(s) are heated separately to reach 170 °C (340 °F), caramelizing them before the other ingredients are added.[4]Alternatively, all ingredients may be cooked together; in this procedure, the mixture is not heated above the firm ball stage (120 °C (250 °F)), so that caramelization of the milk occurs but not caramelization of the sugars. This type of candy is often called milk caramel or cream caramel.

Caramel Coloring:

Caramel coloring, a dark, bitter-tasting liquid, is the highly concentrated product of near total caramelization, bottled for commercial use. It is used as food coloring and in beverages such as cola.

Chemistry:

Caramelization is the removal of water from a sugar, proceeding to isomerization and polymerization of the sugars into various high-molecular-weight compounds. Compounds such as difructose anhydride may be created from the monosaccharides after water loss. Fragmentation reactions result in low-molecular-weight compounds that may be volatile and may contribute to flavor. Polymerization reactions lead to larger-molecular-weight compounds that contribute to the dark-brown color.
In modern recipes and in commercial production, glucose (from corn syrup or wheat) or invert sugar is added to prevent crystallization, making up 10%–50% of the sugars by mass. "Wet caramels" made by heating sucrose and water instead of sucrose alone produce their own invert sugar due to thermal reaction, but not necessarily enough to prevent crystallization in traditional recipes.


Makes About 2 Cups


Ingredients:


1 cup of Granulated sugar
½ cup of Water
¾ cup of Heavy Cream, warmed slightly, either in a small saucepan or microwave
2 Tbsp of Unsalted butter at room temperature
¼ tsp of Salt
½ tsp of Vanilla Extract

Method:


1) In a large non stick sauce pan combine the sugar and water, cook over medium low heat until the sugar dissolves. Just swirl the pan around or use a wooden spoon or steel whisk to stir. Dont use plastic it will melt.

Once the sugar has dissolved, turn the heat to medium high and let it bubble away until it turns a deep amber color, about 8 to 10 minutes.



2) Turn the heat down to low at this point and add the warm heavy cream slowly. Be careful because it will bubble vigorously. Keep whisking until everything is combined and turn the heat off.




3) Add the butter, salt and vanilla and whisk in until the butter melts. Set aside to cool completely.





Tips:


1.Don't put spatulas inside syrup,due to heat it may melt.

2.Don't wait for color to too much change to brown ,it will turn the sauce to bitter.

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