Monday, June 30, 2014

Mulai-itta Paruppu (Sprouted Dal) Thuvaran

Sprouting is the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten raw or cooked. Sprouted foods are a convenient way to have fresh vegetables for salads, or otherwise, in any season and can be germinated at home or produced industrially. They are a prominent ingredient of the raw food diet and common in Eastern Asian cuisine. Sprouting is also applied on a large scale to barley as a part of the malting process. A potential downside to consuming raw sprouts is that the process of germinating seeds can also be conducive to harmful bacterial growth.
Increases in protein quality
Increases in crude fiber content
Increases in essential fatty acids
Increases in vitamin content
SIMILARITIES
Sprouted and dried lentils offer similar amounts of manganese and zinc. Both foods contain 1.2 milligrams of zinc, which contributes 15 per toward the daily zinc intake recommended for women and 11 percent for men. Zinc controls nerve function, which is important for your senses of taste and smell, and it maintains the health of your immune system. Dried and sprouted lentils also provide a significant amount of manganese. This is 0.32 milligram per serving for dried lentils or 0.39 milligram for sprouted lentils. This manganese contributes toward your daily recommended intake, with 2.3 milligrams for men and 1.8 milligrams for women, and benefits your health by promoting brain function and helping to control your blood sugar.
IRON CONTENT
Look to sprouted lentils over dried lentils as a source of beneficial iron. Your body needs iron to perform the electron-transport chain, which is a series of chemical reactions that generate useable energy for your tissues. Iron also helps your white blood cells function, which helps keep your body free of infection and also contributes to heme, a chemical needed for oxygen transport. A serving of sprouted lentils contains 2.5 milligrams of iron, which is 31 percent of the recommended daily intake for men and 14 percent for women, while a calorie-matched portion of dried lentils contains 1.8 milligrams of iron.
COPPER CONTENT
Sprouted lentils also provide significantly more copper per serving than their dried counter parts. Each serving of sprouted lentils offers 271 micrograms of copper, which is 30 percent of the recommended daily intake, while a calorie-matched portion of dried lentils contains just 125 micrograms, or 14 percent of your daily needs. Copper activates cytochrome c oxidase, which is a protein your body uses to make energy, and also helps produce melanin, a pigment protein found in your eyes, hair and skin.
FOLATE CONTENT
Opt for dried lentils over sprouted and you'll consume more folate. Each portion of dried lentils offers an impressive 115 micrograms of folate, which makes up 29 percent of the recommended daily intake. A calorie-matcher portion of sprouted lentils, in contrast, contains 77 micrograms of folate. The folate in lentils helps you make S-adenosylmethionine, which is a chemical your cells use to control gene activity. The ability to turn genes on and off, as needed, proves essential to tissue health, because gene dysregulation contributes to cancer growth. Folate also plays a key role in healthy fetal development, and helps support a healthy pregnancy.

HOW TO SPROUT:

You need to use whole Dal/Lentils for sprouting.
I Used Whole Masoor Dal,you can use any Dal you prefer.YOu can also use unsprouted Dal for this recipe too.
Wash and clean the Dal thoroughly ,then let it soak in water for 2 to 3 hrs.
Then put it in a filter and remove water.Then put it in a muslin cloth or any cotton kitchen towel which has pores for breathing of sprouts.
Then wrap it in muslin cloth and place in a bowl with another bowl covered on top.
For me it took 2 days to have a big sprouts.

Nutritional Info:

For 8 Oz :
Calories
216
Total Fat
15.8g
Sat. Fat
13.8g
Cholest.
0mg
Sodium
390.4mg
Carb.
15.8g
Fiber
7.4g
Sugars
3.4g
Protein
5.9g

Ingredients:

Whole Masoor Dal - 1/2 cup(after sprouting it will be around 2 cups)
Turmeric Pd - 1 tsp
Asafoetida - 1/4 tsp

For Grinding:

Coconut - 1 cup shreaded
Cumin Seeds - 1 tsp
Garlic Clove - 1 small
Red Chilly Soaked in warm water for 10 min - 2 no / Chilly Pd - 1/2 tsp

Just pulse the above four ingredients once or twice don't grind it too much.

For Tadka:

Coconut oil - 1 tsp
Mustard Seeds - 1 tsp
Curry leaf - 1 sprig
Red Chilly Broken - 2 

Method:


1.Pressure cook Dal with turmeric and asafoetida with 1 1/2 cup water for 3 whistles.Then open lid and cook Dal till all water is evaporated.
 2.Once all water is gone , add pulsed coconut mixture and salt and mix well

 3.Main thing about thuvaran is keep them in a heap and let it cook in steam of its own (which is called padachu vachu vevikanum in malayalam - There is even a say "aviyal adachu vachu vevikanum" and "thuvaran padachu vacchu veveikanum" in malayalam).But do this for 5 min only.
4,Then make Tadka of coconut oil ,mustard seeds ,red chilly and curry leaf and add this to the dal mixture.Mix and serve hot.
5.You can serve this with rice as a side dish or you can have it as is as a tiffin too.This alone is a very filling dish.

 
 
 

 

 Tips:

1.Similar recipe made with whole moong dal is one of the famous break fast .That can be served as is or with puttu as puttu payaru papadam.

Tomato Dal Tadka


Nutritional Info:

For 2.5 Oz:
Calories
47
Total Fat
1.4g
Sat. Fat
1.1g
Cholest.
0mg
Sodium
206.3mg
Carb.
6.6g
Fiber
2.6g
Sugars
1.3g
Protein
2.6g

Ingredients:

Masoor Dal - 1/2 cup
Turmeric Pd - 1 tsp
Asafoetida - 1/4 tsp

For Tadka:

Coconut Oil - 1 tsp
Mustard Seeds - 1 tsp
Cumin Seeds - 1 tsp
Red Chilly - 2 broken
Curry Leaf - 1 sprig
Tomato - 1 cup chopped
Turmeric Pd - 1/2 tsp
Salt
Coriander Leaf - 1/4 cup chopped

Method:

1.Pressure Cook Dal with turmeric and asafoetida with 11/2 cup water to 5 whistles.
 3.Mash it well.
 3.In a pan add oil,then add mustards seeds once they start to splutter add cumin seeds ,curry leaf and red chillies.Then add tomato and turmeric pd.Saute it till tomato is completely disintegrated.Add little water if necessary.

 4.Then add Dal and add salt .Add needed water to the consistency you prefer.
Then garnish with coriander leaf.

 5.Tomato Dal Tadka is ready to serve with rice and ghee or even roti.








Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Sadya Special - Kitchadi


Kitchadi is one of the main dish in Sadya.The important thing in making kitchadi is 'patcha kadugu' (Raw mustard) soaked and ground along with coconut.As it is a prominent dish in sadya lets see the recipe below.

Some Pointers about Sadya:


Way of serving a Kerala sadya
Sadya is a traditional Kerala feast served on a clean green banana leaf. It is a sumptuous spread of rice and more than 14 delicious vegetable dishes, followed by different varieties of payasams. The dishes include parippu curry,sambar, rasam,olan, kalan, pachadi, kichadi, aviyal, and thoran.
Sadya is served in a very unique way. The banana leaf is placed before a person so that its narrow part always points to the left side. Sadya is served from the top left corner of the leaf, on which is placed in order, a small yellow bananasarkara upperi, Upperi and papad. Then the mango pickle, injipuli (a thick ginger tamarind curry), lime pickle, thoran, olan, avial, pachadi,  kichadi, Erissery, Koottukary  and salt are placed in order on the rest of the upper half of the leaf.
Once all these items are placed, the rice is served at the bottom center of the leaf. First parippu is served. Then sambar and kalan (many places it will be already there in the leaf with the above list) are served in that order. Rasam is served after this.On completion of the meals, a variety of payasams, including pal payasam, are served.Palada Pradhaman is famous in north Kerala.  Then curd / buttermik is served at the end to complete the meal and to help digestion.
ANOTHER WAY....
The preparations for traditional onasadya or onam sadya begin well in advance. Pickles, ‘sarkara varatti’ and ‘upperi’ (banana chips) are made in advance. Some items like ingipuli and pachadi the day before Thiruonam. The number of vegetarian delicacies in an Onasadya today ranges from five to 12. Earlier it used be between 16 and 24 and in some traditional onam sadya it used be eight varieties of eight items that is a whopping 64. But nowadays the number of items is limited and non-vegetarian fare has also entered into the menu list.
Serving the onasadya is an art in itself. And eating the onasadya is an even bigger art. The traditional method of eating helps in digesting such a huge vegetarian fare.
Onasadya is served on banana leaves and it is laid on the table or ground and the narrow part of the leaf should always be on the left side.
Serving begins from the bottom left half of the leaf. In some areas a pinch of salt is kept on the leaf but some people avoid it.
  • On the bottom left half of the leaf a small banana is placed.
  • Next Pappadam (In some places later with the parippu curry)
  • Then sarkara varatti (jaggery coated banana chips) and upperi (banana chips)
  • Next from the top left half of the banana leaf ‘big lime curry’
  • then, pickle
  • Inchicurry or inchipuli
  • Thoran (dry vegetable with coconut)
  • Olan
  • Avial
  • Pachadi
  • Kichadi
Now the plantain leaf is filled with all the side dishes and most people will have dipped their fingers in some of the delicacies to have a taste.
  • The rice is served at the bottom center of the banana leaf.
  • First, parippu curry is served along with ghee.
  • Next rice is served with Sambhar.
  • Next Kalan or Rasam
  • Then comes the most anticipated part the Ada Pradaman (payasam or sweet).
The right way is to it on the banana leaf along with some small lime pickle. But sadly nowadays most people prefer it in cups.
Most people stop with the sweet but the traditional onasadya is not over yet.
Some people take some more rice along with puliseri or mooru (curry from curd).
The ways of serving differs in different areas and with different Hindu castes

Nutritional Info:

For 2 Oz:
Calories
18
Total Fat
1.3g
Sat. Fat
1.1g
Cholest.
0.6mg
Sodium
52.5mg
Carb.
1.4g
Fiber
0.3g
Sugars
0.8g
Protein
0.4g

Ingredients:

Vellarikai / Indian Cucumber / Dosakai - 2 cups diced finely(peeled)
Salt 
Curry Leaf - 1 sprig
Yogurt - 1/2 cup for mixing

For Grinding:

Coconut - 3/4 cup
Mustards Seeds - 1 tsp (soaked in water for 20 min)
Yogurt - 2 tbsp
Green Chilly - 1 or 2 (according to the spice level of your preference)


For Tadka:

Coconut Oil -1 tsp
Mustard Seeds - 1 tsp
Cumin Seeds - 1 tsp
Curry Leaf - 1 sprig
Red Chilly - 3 broken in halves.

Method:

1.Take a pan and add cut cucumber and add water and salt and let it cook.
 2.Once its 3/4 cooked add curry leaf and let it cook till the cucumber is soft.Switch off  the flame.Let it cool for 5 min.
 3.Add the ground mixture and mix well.

4.Add Extra Yogurt according to the thickness you need.

 5.MAke Tadka seperatly with coconut oil.

 6.Add it on top of the cucumber mixture and mix and serve.






Friday, June 20, 2014

Soya Rabdi

I was checking my storage cabinet and i found a box of  soya chunks sitting for a long time ,so decided to make something out of it.

Not able to decide sweet or spicy recipe again i wandered through the cabinet and i found this packet of rabdi sitting for a long time ,so decided to put them together and create a pudding recipe.Why dont you try this and enjoy it too.

If you don't have radbi mix add milk while cooking soya instead of water and add sugar(1/4 cup sugar),cardamom powder( 1 tsp) too.

Nutritional Info:

For 6.5 Oz:
Calories
212
Total Fat
4.4g
Sat. Fat
1.2g
Cholest.
9.6mg
Sodium
1.1mg
Carb.
26.9g
Fiber
0.8g
Sugars
17.7g
Protein
17g

Ingredients:

Soya Mini Chunks - 100 gms
Rabdi Ready Mix - 1 pkt(100 gms)
Almonds Crushed - 2 tbsp
Raisins - 2 tbsp

Method:

1.Dry Roast Soya Granules till it gives aroma.
 2.Then add water about 1 cup and let it cook completely.
 3.Then add rabdi mix and stir well without forming any lumps.
 3.Then add crushed almonds and raisins and stir for 1 min and switch off flame.
 4.Then let it cool completely ,because soya needs to get the flavour from rabdi ,this will happen only when it sit for few minutes.Serve chill.






Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Valaika Masiyal /Green Unripe Plantain Mashed fry

Nutritional Info:

For 1 Oz:
Calories
33
Total Fat
0.9g
Sat. Fat
0.7g
Cholest.
0mg
Sodium
84.8mg
Carb.
6.7g
Fiber
0.8g
Sugars
3.6g
Protein
0.3g

Ingredients:

Green Banana - 2 ,cut into slices.
Coconut oil -1 tbsp
Mustard Seeds - 1 tsp
Salt
Turmeric Pd - 1tsp
Chilly Pd - 1 tsp

Method:

1.Peel and cut banana in to small cubes and wash them and take it in a wide pan.
To get a soft poriyal:If you want to bite into poriyal skip this step
Add Turmeric Pd,salt,chilly pd and 1/4 cup water and cook it till valaika is cooked completely.
I cooked like this for my toddler.



 2.Take a pan and add coconut oil,then add mustard seeds and curry leaf.Now add cooked valaika .
and mix well and roast it till all valaika is crisped up.

If you skipped precooking valaika .
You can add valaika to oil once mustard seeds splutter and then add turmeric pd,chilly pd ,salt and keep stirring and make it crisp.







ChowChow and Keerai Kootu Curry (Kerela Style)




About Chayote:


The chayote (Sechium edule), also known as christophene or christophine, cho-cho,mirliton or merleton (Creole/Cajun),chuchu (Brazil), Cidra (Antioquia, Caldas, Quindio and Risaralda regions of Colombia), Guatila (Boyacá and Valle del Cauca regions of Colombia), Centinarja (Malta), Pipinola (Hawaii), pear squashvegetable pear, chouchoutechokogüisquil (El Salvador), Labu Siam (Indonesia), ishkus (Darjeeling, India) is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, along with melons,cucumbers and squash.
Chayote is originally native to Mexico or Central America where it grows abundantly and has little commercial value, and it has been introduced as a crop all over Latin America, and worldwide. The main growing regions are BrazilCosta Rica and VeracruzMexico. Costa Rican chayotes are predominantly exported to the European Union, whereas Veracruz is the main exporter of chayotes to theUnited States.
The word chayote is a Spanish derivative of the Nahuatl word chayohtli (pronounced [t͡ʃaˈjoʔt͡ɬi]). Chayote was one of the many foods introduced to Europe by early explorers, who brought back a wide assortment of botanical samples. The Age of Conquest also spread the plant south from Mexico, ultimately causing it to be integrated into the cuisine of many other Latin American nations.
The chayote fruit is used in mostly cooked forms. When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash, it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crisp flavor. Though rare and often regarded as especially unpalatable and tough in texture, raw chayote may be added to salads or salsas, most often marinated with lemon or lime juice. Whether raw or cooked, chayote is a good source of amino acids and vitamin C.
Although most people are familiar only with the fruit as being edible, the root, stem, seeds and leaves are as well. The tubers of the plant are eaten like potatoes and other root vegetables, while the shoots and leaves are often consumed in salads and stir fries, especially inAsia. Like other members of the gourd family, such as cucumbers, melons, and squash, chayote has a sprawling habit, and it should only be planted if there is plenty of room in the garden. The roots are also highly susceptible to rot, especially in containers, and the plant in general is finicky to grow. However, in Australia and New Zealand, it is an easily grown yard or garden plant, set on a chicken wiresupport or strung against a fence.

Culinary Uses:

The fruit does not need to be peeled to be cooked or fried in slices. Most people regard it as having a very mild flavor by itself (though some find it unpalatable). It is commonly served with seasonings (e.g. salt, butter and pepper in Australia) or in a dish with other vegetables and/or flavorings. It can also be boiled, stuffed, mashed, baked, fried, or pickled in escabeche sauce. Both fruit and seed are rich in amino acids and vitamin C.Fresh green fruit are firm and without brown spots or signs of sprouting. Smaller ones are more tender.
The tuberous part of the root is starchy and eaten like a yam (can be fried). It can be used as pig or cattle fodder, as well.
The leaves and fruit have diureticcardiovascular and anti-inflammatory properties, and a tea made from the leaves has been used in the treatment of arteriosclerosis and hypertension, and to dissolve kidney stones.
In Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine, the fruit, known as mirliton (pronounced IPA: [ˈmɜːlɪtɒn]) also spelled mirletons or merletons (plural—the r is often silent, e.g. Cajun me-lay-taw or urban Creole miʁl-uh-tɔ̃ns) is a popular seasonal dish for the holidays, especially around Thanksgiving, in a variety of recipes.
Chayote is an important part of traditional diets across Mesoamerica, and can be found in a variety of dishes.

Philippines chayote tops
In the Philippines, the plant is known as "Sayote" and is grown mostly on Mountainous part of the country such as Baguio City and parts ofCordillera Administrative Region. Chayote is used in many kinds of dishes such as soup, stir-fried vegetables and chop suey.
In Indonesia, chayotes are called labu siam and widely planted for their shoots and fruit. It's generally used in Sundanese food as "lalap" and one of ingredients for Sundanese cuisine called "sayur asem".
In Taiwan, chayotes are widely planted for their shoots, known as lóng xü cài (龍鬚菜, literally "dragon-whisker vegetable"). Along with the young leaves, the shoot is a commonly consumed vegetable in the region.
In Thai cuisine, the plant is known as sayongte (Thaiซายองเต้) or fak maeo (Thaiฟักแม้ว, literally meaning "Miao melon"). It grows mainly in the mountains of northern Thailand. The young shoots and greens are often eaten stir-fried or in certain soups.
In Brazil and other Latin American countries, it is breaded and fried, or used cooked in salads, soups and soufflés.
In Nepal, the plant and fruit is called iskus (इस्कुस in Nepali), probably derived from the word squash. Its shoots, fruit and roots are widely used for different varieties of curries.
Chayote is also popular in South Indian cuisine. It is popularly referred to as "Bangalore brinjal (Bengaluru vankayya)", called in Kannada as "seeme badanekai" - brinjal/eggplant/aubergine of the plateau. It is used in vegetable stews like sambar and palya.
In Tamil Nadu in South India, it is known as "Chuw Chuw" and widely used in everyday cooking for "Saambar" or "Kootu". In Andhra Pradesh it is called Bengaluru vankaya and sold in vegetable markets in the name of "chow chow".

Folklore:

"Apple pie"
In Australia, where it is called choko, a persistent rumour is that McDonald's apple pies were made of chokos, not apples. This eventually led McDonald's to emphasise the fact that real apples are used in their pies. This legend was based on an earlier belief that tinned pears were often disguised chokos. A possible explanation for the rumour is that there are a number of recipes in Australia that advise chokos can be used in part replacement of canned apples to make the fruit go farther in making apple pies. This likely arose because of the economies of "mock" food substitutes during the Depression Era, shortages of canned fruit in the years following World War II, and the fact apples do not grow in many tropical and subtropical parts of Australia, making them scarce. Chokos, on the other hand, grow extensively in Australia, with many suburban backyards featuring choko vines growing along their fence lines.
Another possible reason for the rumour of McDonald's apple pies containing chokos was that it was thought that apples would degenerate and become soggy and inedible in a McDonald's pie, whereas chokos are well known to retain their firmness and consistency after cooking, freezing, and reheating. It was thought that the "chunks" of apple in the pie were in fact chunks of choko, and the sauce and filling were simply a spiced, apple-flavoured concoction.
Mummies
Due to its purported cell-regenerative properties, it is believed as a contemporary legend that this fruit caused the mummification of people from the Colombian town of San Bernardo who extensively consumed it. The very well preserved skin and flesh can be seen in the mummies today.


Nutritional Info:

For 50 Gms:
Calories
47
Total Fat
1.4g
Sat. Fat
1g
Cholest.
-
Sodium
7.6mg
Carb.
6.9g
Fiber
2.2g
Sugars
1.4g
Protein
2.2g

Ingredients:


ChowChow - 2 cups
Spinach - 2 cups
Turmeric Pd - 1 tsp
Salt

For Grinding:

Coconut - 1/2 cup
Jeera - 1 tsp
Green chilly -1

Grind these to a fine paste

To Cook Dal:

Toor Dal  - 1/2 cup
Channa Dal - 1/2 cup(you can also use only one type of Dal too)
Asafoetida / Hing - a pinch
Turmeric Pd - 1 tsp

Cook Dal For 3 to 4 whistles with 3/4 cups of water.It should not be too mushy nor too gritty.
Cooking in open flame is suggested so you don't overcook.




For Tempering:

Coconut Oil - 1 tbsp
Urad Dal - 1 tsp
Mustard Seeds -1 tsp
Curry Leaf - 1 sprig

Method:

1.Peel and Cut Chow Chow to bite size pieces and wash them.Add Chowchow and spinach to pressure cooker pan and cook them for 1 whistle.You can also cook in open flame.I forget to add turmeric pd,but add a little .



2.Then add Cooked dal and mix well.Add salt as needed.Dal must be more than vegetable and the while kootu must be thick in consistency.



3.Then add the ground mixture and mix well.Once you add coconut switch off the flame.
5.Now make tadka using coconut oil,mustard seeds,urad dal and curry leaf and Add This tadka to the kootu and add salt as needed.



6.Transfer to a serving dish and serve hot with rice and ghee.